What Authors Really Want

Most authors recognize that in order to get published today, a manuscript must be edited and prepared for publication before it is ever sent for consideration. Most publishers today do not have the staff, the time, or the money to edit a book once it has been accepted, unless, of course, you are one of the elite authors for whom such things are still the norm.
That said, most authors understand that they must have another eye critique and edit their work before it is sent off to a publishing house.

What many authors don’t understand, however, is that an editor’s job is not simply to rave about the work, declare it ready to go, and fix a few spelling and punctuation errors. Any editor worth paying will read the book with a critical eye and provide honest feedback. Editors should not be hired as ego strokers. It is our job to look at the work and find ways to improve it, ways that would be readily apparent to any reader at any decent publishing house.

As a writer, I know how hard it is to put my work out for review, after I’ve slaved over every sentence, nuanced every line, and agonized over the structure, plot, and storyline. But I also know that when I do have other, knowledgeable readers critique my work, I am able to improve my writing in ways that weren’t readily apparent to me.

As an editor, I have frequently encountered those authors who truly want my professional opinion and suggestions. These are the delightful clients, ones for whom I am willing to put in longer hours and more effort. But there are a few authors who seek my advice and then get indignant when I make suggestions for improvement. For these authors, their works are their children, and how dare I criticize what they have created. These are the authors from whom I know I should run, because neither of us will be satisfied: not them with my editing, and not me with their final product.

But that’s what makes the world go round. Me, with my opinions, and they, with theirs. As an editor, I have to realize that I cannot always edit a work to my vision, but must accommodate the author’s vision first and foremost, but only after I have given my honest opinion, assessment, and suggestions.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s